Ketubah Texts

Here’s an easy place to read all of the standard texts available on my ketubot.

Note: I strongly recommend checking with your rabbi or officiant before choosing your ketubah text! Many rabbis and cantors have very specific requirements, and may even totally reject the text you were planning on choosing. To avoid any unpleasant surprises at the wedding, you want to make sure your officiant is 100% happy with your choice. If he/she requires any changes to my wording, I’ll be happy to make edits, though there may be a fee, depending on the extent of the change.

Don’t see your preferred text on the ketubah design you like best? In some cases I don’t offer a particular text on a design because it’s likely to be rejected by the rabbis who would officiate at that wedding (for example, I have yet to meet an orthodox rabbi who will allow an amorphous-shaped text-block, or an interlinear text). In most cases, though, if your rabbi or officiant approves, I’m happy to add any wording to a ketubah, regardless of whether it’s shown as available on the order page – just ask to make sure!

Looking for something a little different? No problem! I’m happy to adjust/alter/change my texts to suit your preferences. If it’s a small change, there may not even be a charge. Or feel free to write your own text! Just make sure to get copyright permission from the author if you want to borrow wording you didn’t compose yourself.

All texts here, and all custom texts — any wording of your choice — are available on all designs except the lithograph version of Illuminated Letters Ketubah.

All texts on this website are registered with the Copyright Office, and may not be used without express written permission. Copyright (c)Melissa Dinwiddie 2001, 2002, 2003.

Conservative Ketubah Text (with Lieberman Clause; with or without English)

Ketubah Text: Conservative w/Lieberman Clause & English

Here’s what the Aramaic text says. Note: this English translation of the Aramaic text DOES NOT actually appear on any of my ketubot. Instead, the Aramaic is paired with my English Egalitarian text (as shown above).

“On __________ [day of the week], the __________ day of the month __________ in the year __________ since creation of the world, the era according to which we are accustomed to reckon here in the city of __________ how __________ son of __________ said to this virgin __________ daughter of __________ ‘Be thou my wife according to the law of Moses and Israel, and I will work for thee, honor, support, and maintain thee in accordance with the custom of Jewish husbands who work for their wives, honor, support, and maintain them in truth. And I will set aside for thee 200 zuz [traditional money], in lieu of thy virginity, which belong to thee (according to the law of Moses), and thy food, clothing, and necessaries, and live with thee in conjugal relations according to universal custom.’ And __________ this virgin consented and became his wife. The dowry that she brought from her father’s house, in silver, gold, valuables, dresses and bedclothes, amounts to __________ [100 silver pieces], and the bridegroom consented to increase this amount from his own property with the sum of __________ [100 silver pieces], making in all __________ [200 silver pieces]. And thus said __________ the bridegroom, ‘I take upon myself and my heirs after me the responsibility of this marriage contract, of the dowry, and of the additional sum, so that all this shall be paid from the best part of my property, real and personal, that I now possess or may hereafter acquire. All my property, even the mantle on my shoulders, shall be mortgaged for the security of the contract and of the dowry and of the addition made thereto.’ __________ the bridegroom has taken upon himself the responsibility for all the obligations of this ketubah, as is customary with other ketubot made for the daughters of Israel in accordance with the institution of our sages — may their memory be for a blessing! It is not to be regarded as an illusory obligation or as a mere symbolical delivery between __________ son of __________ the bridegroom, and __________ daughter of __________ the virgin, and they have employed an instrument legally fit for the purpose to strengthen all that is stated above, and everything is valid and established.

[Lieberman Clause starts here] And in solemn assent to their mutual responsibilities and love, the bridegroom and bride have declared: as evidence to our desire to enable each other to live in accordance with the Jewish law of marriage throughout our lifetime, we, the bride and bridegroom, attach our signatures to this ketubah, and hereby agree to recognize the Bet Din of the Rabbinical Assembly and the Jewish Theological Seminary of America, or its duly appointed representatives, as having authority to council us in the light of Jewish tradition which requires husband and wife to give each other complete love and devotion, and to summon either party at the request of the other, in order to enable the party so requesting to live in accordance with the standards of Jewish law of marriage throughout his or her lifetime. We authorize the Bet Din to impose such terms of compensation as it may see fit for failure to respond to its summons or to carry out its decision.”

Egalitarian Ketubah Text 

Also available in Hebrew-only or English-only — just ask!

Ketubah Text: Egalitarian (Reform)

 

Interfaith Ketubah Text

Also available in Hebrew-only or English-only — just ask!

Interfaith Ketubah Text

Equal Partners Commitment Ketubah Text (Female – for Lesbian Weddings)

Also available in Hebrew-only or English-only — just ask!

Equal Partners Ketubah Text (Female) - for lesbian weddings

Equal Partners Ketubah Text (Male/Universal – for Gay Weddings)

This text is also appropriate for heterosexual unions, and has been very popular with heterosexual customers. Also available in Hebrew-only or English-only — just ask! 

Equal Partners Ketubah Text (Male/Universal - for Gay Weddings)

Anniversary Ketubah Texts

More and more couples are coming to me to get after-the-fact ketubot. I composed my anniversary texts specifically for couples looking for a beautiful way to mark the years they’ve been together. Many anniversary couples also choose to go with a “wedding” text — Egalitarian is a popular choice.

Anniversary Egalitarian

Also available in Hebrew-only or English-only — just ask! 

Anniversary Ketubah Text (for Jewish couples)

Anniversary Interfaith

Also available in Hebrew-only or English-only — just ask! 

Anniversary Ketubah Text (Interfaith)

English Only (Nonsectarian) Ketubah Text

Identical to Interfaith, without reference to Hebrew date. (If you want the Hebrew date included, no problem — just be sure to make a note when you fill out your personalization questionnaire!)

English-Only Ketubah Text

Orthodox Ketubah Text (with or without English)

Orthodox Ketubah Text

Here’s what the Aramaic text says. Note: this English translation of the Aramaic text DOES NOT actually appear on any of my ketubot. Instead, the Aramaic is paired with my English Egalitarian text (as shown above).

“On __________ [day of the week], the __________ day of the month __________ in the year __________ since creation of the world, the era according to which we are accustomed to reckon here in the city of __________ how __________ son of __________ said to this virgin __________ daughter of __________ ‘Be thou my wife according to the law of Moses and Israel, and I will work for thee, honor, support, and maintain thee in accordance with the custom of Jewish husbands who work for their wives, honor, support, and maintain them in truth. And I will set aside for thee 200 zuz [traditional money], in lieu of thy virginity, which belong to thee (according to the law of Moses), and thy food, clothing, and necessaries, and live with thee in conjugal relations according to universal custom.’ And __________ this virgin consented and became his wife. The dowry that she brought from her father’s house, in silver, gold, valuables, dresses and bedclothes, amounts to __________ [100 silver pieces], and the bridegroom consented to increase this amount from his own property with the sum of __________ [100 silver pieces], making in all __________ [200 silver pieces]. And thus said __________ the bridegroom, ‘I take upon myself and my heirs after me the responsibility of this marriage contract, of the dowry, and of the additional sum, so that all this shall be paid from the best part of my property, real and personal, that I now possess or may hereafter acquire. All my property, even the mantle on my shoulders, shall be mortgaged for the security of the contract and of the dowry and of the addition made thereto.’ __________ the bridegroom has taken upon himself the responsibility for all the obligations of this ketubah, as is customary with other ketubot made for the daughters of Israel in accordance with the institution of our sages — may their memory be for a blessing! It is not to be regarded as an illusory obligation or as a mere symbolical delivery between __________ son of __________ the bridegroom, and __________ daughter of __________ the virgin, and they have employed an instrument legally fit for the purpose to strengthen all that is stated above, and everything is valid and established.”